2020

the sun practice; september 24th
utopia, an embodied approach to; september 29th

Stockholm, SE

maximum number of attendees: 40
please register

by writing to annaidagrip@gmail.com 

 

these events are made possible with the support of Hallen i Farsta and ccap as part of PASS I HALL

 

***

about the sun practice:

2021 will mark a decade since i first stumbled upon the sun practice in my bedroom on the third floor of a building that around the corner from parvis de saint-gilles. the afternoon was sunny, the world quiet.

to commemorate this occasion, i started working on a documentary film which will follow Edvard Stokstad (who is also making the film) studying the practice. september 24th is when Edvard's going to see the practice for the first time. 

you are invited to be our witness.

the documentary will also follow me writing a lecture performance with which i'm hoping to tell the story of the sun practice and how i think it reads butler and austin's work on the notion of performativity.

the lecture will be performed along-side edvard's take on the sun practice. together, i hope, the two works will offer an embodied perspective to performativity and possibly say something about all the ways in which this deconstructionist theory can be used to actually construct an embodied and a queer futurity.

#queerdreaming

***

about utopia, an embodied approach to:

i presented this dance talk recently at the Bucharest International Dance Film Festival. because some of the stories told in the lecture concern the history of Stockholm, i thought it'd be really fun to share them with you.

 

here's what i wrote about the lecture.

Much of my thinking these days is engaged in the attempt to explain to myself the extent of the influence Descartes and his work on what is popularly referred to as the theory of the mind-body split had on the way in which standards of value become defined and successfully upheld in the context of the neoliberal and colonising, culturally white west. In this talk that I was invited to give, I will try my best to present evidence of the way the theory of the mind-body split is integrated in the white western cultural canon by portraying the way the theory manifests in practice, in the assumptions that cultural white westerners traditionally make, for example, and/or in the way in which cultural white westerners traditionally jump to conclusions. In other words, I will be attempting to tell the story of how I think a theory that discriminates against the body became not just embodied (!) but embodied as a dominant global culture whose practices are competitive, anxious, self-centred, object-oriented and obsessed with power. This is the story of dystopia, one we’re all – I’m sure – already intimately acquainted with. 

The reason I’d like to tell you the story of dystopia is because deep within its folds lays hidden another story, the story of utopia. This is the story of an integrated dynamic between the mind and the body; the story of embodiment in which reality is not measured in “hard facts” but is a matter of negotiation, participation and motivation. 

If utopia (this is a mind exercise), folded within dystopia, exists in the state of a seed exists in relative to the soil inside of which it is buried, my hope is to be able to suggest what it is that we need to know, what elements there are that we need to be able to relate to in order to encourage utopia to sprout and grow. This is the final story I'd like to tell on this occasion, this is the story of gardening.

october 1

Stockholm, SE

letters to process, edited by anne vigeland, launch in tandem with the rerun of linda blomqvist's selma


Graphic design: Abudi Alsaleh.
Participating artists: Diana Agunbiade-Kolawole, Liza Baliasnaja, Linda Blomqvist, Tim Høibjerg, Inez Jönsson, Rebecca Lindsmyr, Theo Livesey, Natasja Mabesoone, Stina Nyberg, pavleheidler, Pontus Pettersson, Nicklas Randau, Adam Seid Tahir, Eirik Senje, Elinor Tollerz Bratteby.

Letters to Process has been published as part of a degree project within the International Master’s Programme in Curating Art at Stockholm University.

2021

september 2021

London, UK

The Physical Consequence to Knowing at Mapping Dance and Dance Teaching: Past(s), Present and Future(s) conference at University of Roehampton

the archive

september 6

Bucharest, RO

speaking on UTOPIA at the Bucharest International Dance Film Festival.

link

description

 

Much of my thinking these days is engaged in the attempt to explain to myself the extent of the influence Descartes and his work on what is popularly referred to as the theory of the mind-body split had on the way in which standards of value become defined and successfully upheld in the context of the neoliberal and colonising, culturally white west. In this talk that I was invited to give, I will try my best to present evidence of the way the theory of the mind-body split is integrated in the white western cultural canon by portraying the way the theory manifests in practice, in the assumptions that cultural white westerners traditionally make, for example, and/or in the way in which cultural white westerners traditionally jump to conclusions. In other words, I will be attempting to tell the story of how I think a theory that discriminates against the body became not just embodied (!) but embodied as a dominant global culture whose practices are competitive, anxious, self-centred, object-oriented and obsessed with power. This is the story of dystopia, one we’re all – I’m sure – already intimately acquainted with.

The reason I’d like to tell you the story of dystopia is because deep within its folds lays hidden another story, the story of utopia. This is the story of an integrated dynamic between the mind and the body; the story of embodiment in which reality is not measured in “hard facts” but is a matter of negotiation, participation and motivation.

If utopia (this is a mind exercise), folded within dystopia, exists in the state of a seed exists in relative to the soil inside of which it is buried, my hope is to be able to suggest what it is that we need to know, what elements there are that we need to be able to relate to in order to encourage utopia to sprout and grow. This is the final story I'd like to tell on this occasion, this is the story of gardening.

july 20 <> 26

the internet

the 2020 IDOCDE residency and symposium

April, May, June

the internet

 

in residence at Konstnärsnämnden with Alys Longley. picking the work up from where Skye Reynolds and I left it. 

 

Alys and I will look at the activity that is transforming the virtual into the material. here's an excerpt from my application to Konstnärsnämnden:

What decides green from blue? is a metaphor with which I am trying to target a hypothesis: that a stereotype–e.g. “Dancing expresses things that cannot be expressed in language.”–has been preventing dance artists from developing deep & critical understandings of the practice of dancing, and the language with which to communicate how knowledge developed within the framework of dance studies is relevant in always contemporary (and especially: today’s) socio-economic climate; particularly informative to organising movements towards social justice and change.

My aim is to start with the premise that language can, in fact, express what dancing can express, albeit in different ways. The question is: how do these ways differ? Methodologically, for example. What is similar between the experience of deciding “to arabesque” (in dancing) and the experience of deciding “green from blue” (in writing or drawing)? There is also the question of aesthetic value and legibility (culturally speaking) which I’d like to examine: who can recognise an arabesque from a leg raised behind one’s back, and how does that (awareness? sensitivity?) influence the dancer’s choice-making?

November 21st (4PM-8PM EST) via ZOOM

hosted by CCOV, Montreal, Canada

in collaboration with le PARC


language is an intangible bridge

(in French, English and Spanish)

an artistic experiment in collaboration, co-creation and touch

Alys Longley (NZ) Macarena Campbell, Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira, Eduardo Cerón-Tilleria, Rolando Sanhueza (Chile), pavleheidler (Sweden)

 


FREE REGISTRATIONS (click here) and more information
 


This lecture-workshop presents an experiment in collaboration across distance and time zones. It tests working methods for the Cartón/ Cardboard project (led by Macarena Campbell and Alys Longley), with artists in Auckland, NZ, Santiago, Chile and Stockholm, Sweden) in which we work with cardboard as an equalizing and accessible skin. In this way artists in different continents share the same experiments in touch and collaboration from geographically separated terrains. We will work with scores, instructions, poetics, experimental documentation, creating performance materials and expanded fields of choreography and writing. This project is inflected by the geopolitics of the Global South.

To participate in the workshop aspect of this presentation, please collect cardboard of different sizes, craft knives, scissors, drawing materials, paper and any other craft and art materials that you desire. Be prepared to send digital images and video to a shared file during the session. We are aiming to co-create an artist-book in the real time of the workshop with documentation contributed by attendees.

written by Alys Longley

made with the support of

  • Vimeo - Black Circle
  • Twitter
  • Instagram

Studying and teaching speaking multimedially in the face of a culture of oppression, aggression, and false scarcity. Catered to dancers, queers, artists, and activists across the board.

©pavleheidler